Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

D/2 Biological Solution

Q:  I used D2 on my aunt’s gravestone this morning by spraying it and leaving it on the stone.  It appeared to work fine so I left it to do it’s biological work.  I next sprayed it on my grandfather’s grave located next to my aunt’s and it immediately turned the stone a rusty color.  I believe it was because of lichen on the stone.  I scrubbed the stone with a soft nylon brush and used a lot of water to remove the lichen but I was not able to remove the rust color stain on the large stone.  Do you have any suggestions for me on how to remove the rust colored stain on the stone?  Should I spray more D2 on it and let it sit there?

A: The rusty color or sometimes orange color is due to the lichen and biological material that is dying. We sometimes compare it to a leaf that dies, turns orange and rust color, that means its working. With a few more rains and sun spells it should flush out of the stone pores and go away.

Glacier

Q:  I have Glacier cartridges.  If I only dispense a partial cartridge, what is the shelf life of the rest of the tube?  Any tips on how to prolong the shelf life?

A:  The remaining product in the cartridge will be fine as long as you take steps to seal it well and store it properly.  The main enemies here are moisture and heat.  Once you use the cartridge, we recommend leaving the mix nozzle on the tube—the product will cure inside the mix nozzle, and effectively seal the remaining contents from air and moisture. Store in an area where temperature extremes are minimized, especially high heat.  We suggest leaving it in a climate-controlled area such as an office or warehouse.

Q: I have Glacier in cans.  What is the shelf life if I don’t use the entire amount?  Any tips on how to prolong the shelf life?

A:  The remaining product in the can will be fine as long as you take steps to seal it well and store it properly.  The main enemies here are moisture and heat. If you only have a partial container, the air space above the  product always contains some moisture.  If the container is more than half full, this is not too much of a concern—but with small amounts of product (that is, lots of “head space” in the can), the moisture can cause a problem. So it’s always a good idea to do everything possible to minimize moisture—otherwise, once you do use the product, you may get some foaming as the mixed Glacier cures. In these cases, you can take a tip from the wine aficionados, and use a product called  Bloxygen to displace the air and moisture with a dry, inert gas.  You  can find more about Bloxygen here:   http://www.bloxygen.com/          Lastly—it’s best to store the product in an area where temperature extremes are minimized, especially high heat.  We suggest leaving it in a climate-controlled area such as an office or warehouse.

Q: “I am doing an outdoor kitchen, and wondering which product is best for seaming—-Glacier or Last Patch Gel? “

A:  “Either product can be used—both are light-stable (will not yellow in sunshine).  The short answer is:  we’d suggest Last Patch Gel.  The main difference is strength—Glacier is a rigid, structural, permanent adhesive—you will never open the seam without breaking the stone,  so if you ever foresee that need, use Last Patch.  Last Patch Gel is very strong,  but not strong enough to be considered a structural adhesive—you will most likely not break the stone if you try to open the seam in the future (unless you have a vey soft stone…).  Last Patch Gel is also much more flexible than Glacier—so if your outdoor kitchen will experience extremes of temperature throughout the year, we would recommend Last Patch Gel as it will offer more movement capability than Glacier. “

Ultimate/Historical Restoration Mortar (HRM)

Q: What would you recommend for re-attaching limestone and for patching the areas that can’t be reattached? It’s outside in a northern climate so it has to be able to handle freeze/thaw conditions!

A: Here is what we recommend:

– Re-attaching the stone- BONSTONE ULTIMATE- 190ml cartridges

– Patching any missing areas- Historical Restoration Mortar (HRM)

Last Patch Gel

Q: “I am doing an outdoor kitchen, and wondering which product is best for seaming—-Glacier or Last Patch Gel? “

A:  “Either product can be used—both are light-stable (will not yellow in sunshine).  The short answer is:  we’d suggest Last Patch Gel.  The main difference is strength—Glacier is a rigid, structural, permanent adhesive—you will never open the seam without breaking the stone,  so if you ever foresee that need, use Last Patch.  Last Patch Gel is very strong,  but not strong enough to be considered a structural adhesive—you will most likely not break the stone if you try to open the seam in the future (unless you have a vey soft stone…).  Last Patch Gel is also much more flexible than Glacier—so if your outdoor kitchen will experience extremes of temperature throughout the year, we would recommend Last Patch Gel as it will offer more movement capability than Glacier. “

NautiThane

Q:  “Using NautiThane.  Instructions call to “sand between coats”—is this necessary for proper adhesion between coats, or is it just to ensure a smooth coating?”

A:  The sanding is only to ensure a smooth coating, it is not necessary to achieve adhesion between coats.   UNLESS you are applying a touch-up coat, after the previous coat has been exposed to weathering for some months.  In that case, it IS necessary to sand lightly (“scuff coat”) to ensure good adhesion between the weathered layer and the fresh coat of NautiThane.

NautiPoxy

Q:  “Used NautiPoxy to previously-coated wood.  Sanded down to bare wood, then applied the epoxy—it was fully hard and cured the next day, but looked very mottled.  Did I do something wrong?”

A:  No, this is normal.  NautiPoxy is a thin epoxy, designed to penetrate and fill the pores of new wood to improve its strength, water resistance, and durability.  If applying to wood that has had a previous coating, even if sanding to “bare wood”, you most likely still have the pores of the wood completely filled with the previous coating. NautiPoxy cannot penetrate in this case, and simply builds up on the wood.  With this thick of a coat,  it is not unusual for the NautiPoxy to not properly  flow-out,  and you may get some craters,  depressions, waves, and other defects, resulting in a somewhat “icky” appearance.  This is totally normal, nothing to be concerned about—because you are going tpo sand the NautiPoxy anyway before applying the NautiThane topcoat.  So, just sand the icky-looking NautiPoxy until smooth.  There is no need to go all the way back down to bare wood, just sand enough until it’s smooth and uniform in appearance (you want to, at the very least,  make sure all the shiny spots are sanded smooth).

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